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$400.00 $350.00

Taurus Curve 380 ACP Laser Light Layaway

  • Action: Semi-Automatic
  • Barrel length: 2.5″
  • Overall length: 5.2″
  • Sights: Bore Axis
  • Finish: Black Oxide
  • Grips: Polymer with metallic subframe
  • LED light and laser built into frame
  • NRA logo
  • Made in the USA

Description

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THIS IS A NEW IN THE BOX TAURUS CURVE POCKET PISTOL IN 380 CAL WITH A 2.5″ STAINLESS STEEL BARREL . CURVE SHAPED POLYMER FRAME W/ HOLSTER FREE BELT CLIP INTEGRATED INTO GUN. WEIGHS ONLY 10.2 OZ. HAS LOADED CHAMBER INDICATOR, NO SAFETY AND INTEGRATED LIGHT AND LASER. COMES WITH TWO 6 ROUND MAGAZINES, MANUAL AND HARD CASE

  • Action: Semi-Automatic
  • Barrel length: 2.5″
  • Overall length: 5.2″
  • Sights: Bore Axis
  • Finish: Black Oxide
  • Grips: Polymer with metallic subframe
  • LED light and laser built into frame
  • NRA logo
  • Made in the USA

Thirty years ago, if you wanted a reliable pocket gun, a small .38 Special revolver was the end all and be all unless you wanted to take a gamble on an older, yet well-made .25 ACP. Anything less seemed unreliable. But, times have changed. The .25 is mostly dead and .38 revolvers have taken a backseat to new, more reliable automatics. Guns like the Ruger LCP, the Seecamp and Smith & Wesson Bodyguard epitomize the balance of compactness, power and reliability. And then Taurus upped its game by trying to advance the concept of a pocket gun with the Taurus Curve.

Fully loaded at 13.6 ounces and measuring in at only five inches long, the Taurus Curve qualifies as a pocket gun. The pistol is chambered for .380 ACP, a round that nearly equals the power of standard .38 Special loads. With its six-shot detachable magazines, the reloading aspect is somewhat faster than breaking open a revolver to initiate the reload.

Like others of its class, the Curve has a polymer frame and steel slide. Right away, the complete lack of snag hazards grabbed me by the lapels. The pistol wears no sights and the only obvious high point is the loaded chamber indicator just behind the breech. What Taurus does to make up for sights is a painted crosshair on the back of the receiver where the shrouded hammer rides.

The Curve may appear featureless, but it has a bit more going on. The pistol is equipped with an integral Laserlyte combination laser and light housed forward of the triggerguard. The system is powered by 357 batteries and is activated by a knurled button on the right side of the pistol.

The barrel is cut awkwardly and rounded off to conform to the rounded slide. The grip of the pistol, like so many other pocket guns, is only good for a two-finger grip below the triggerguard, but the stippling on the backstrap and front strap of grip is a smart move.

Unlike other guns in its class, the Curve comes equipped with a detachable belt hook and a trigger sheath so you can carry the gun right out of the box. You also get two magazines, instead of the usual single magazine come with lower-priced “economical” options. The magazines are unique in that the polymer baseplate forms a lip that catches on the inside of the grip. The magazines are released by pinching that base and pulling the magazine free.

Operationally, the Curve has a Browning-style locked breech system that mates the barrel to the slide when the gun is in battery and ready to fire. The pistol has no manual safety and relies on a long, double-action type trigger pull to fire the weapon.

This is typical of many new .380 autoloaders, but one feature stands out—the curve. The grip-frame is curved out to the right-side. This was intended to allow for the gun to be comfortably carried without discomfort or printing through clothing. I will give a clap to Taurus for realizing that the human body is curved and flat autoloaders just don’t cut it sometimes. Taurus—to their credit—thinks outside the box. But for Taurus owners, some pistols are a swing and a miss. Through nearly 400 rounds at the range, I found the Curve to be a near-miss.

EATING THE AMMO OF DEATH
On a cold spring day, I set out with the Taurus Curve and 150 rounds of Tul-Ammo .380 FMJ ammunition. This ammunition is steel cased and is known for having ignition problems due to hard primers. If this gun was going to choke, this had to be the ammo to do it.

Loading the two provided six-round magazines were buttery smooth with no issues. The springs gave good, but not firm resistance to being loaded to full capacity. Unlike most blowback .380s, the Curve doesn’t take much effort to rack, but the lack of material to grip is dicey. The swirling mill marks on the slide allow for a relatively good grip on what is a relatively slick, featureless surface.

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